Category

Poultry

Fire and Forget

By | Angus Meats, Bold Eats, Family, How to, News, Poultry, Recipes | No Comments

Here are three simple, slow-cooker recipes that you can start in the morning and forget about until dinnertime!

Beer Legs

Ingredients:

  • Package of chicken legs, seasoned with salt and pepper
  • Diced onion
  • Bottle (or can) of your favorite beer

Directions: Add all ingredients to your slow-cooker and cook on HIGH for 4 hours or LOW for 8 hours.

Teriyaki Thighs

Ingredients:

  • Package of bone-in chicken thighs
  • ¾ cup soy sauce
  • ¾ cup water
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • 2 tsp. minced garlic
  • ¼ tsp. minced ginger

Directions:

  1. Add chicken thighs to slow cooker
  2. Whisk together remaining ingredients
  3. Pour mixture over chicken and slow cook on HIGH for 4 hours or LOW for 8 hours.

Country Style Pork Ribs

Ingredients:

  • Package of bone-in or boneless pork ribs
  • BBQ rub
  • Bottle of your favorite BBQ sauce

Directions:  Season ribs with the BBQ rub and place in crockpot.  Add BBQ sauce and cook for 4 hours on HIGH or 8 hours on LOW.

Now wasn’t that easy?  The great thing about these recipes is you can change the protein (chicken, beef, pork), but keep the seasonings the same.  Tip: the pork ribs are great with an onion or golden mushroom soup mix as seasoning.

Enjoy all the extra time you’ve saved!!

Just wing it with our temporary price reduction

By | Angus Meats, Buy local, News, Party food, Poultry, Retail | No Comments

Wings, wings, and more wings. During the month of February and March your local Yokes andRosauers stores will have Angus Brands’ precooked hot peppered and honey hickory chicken wings.  During the next two months we will have the wings on a temporary price reduction.  Wings make the perfect party food for watching college hoops (go Zags!) or any gathering. Ask your grocer today!

Warm up with Cranberry-Stuffed Pork Chops

By | Angus Meats, Food Service, Holidays, News, Poultry, Recipes, Retail | No Comments

Bring on the fall season with a tasty recipe for pork chops. You won’t be disappointed!

Ingredients:  

  • 1 6 – ounce pork stuffing mix
  • 1 cup water
  • 1/4 cup butter or margarine, melted
  • 1 14 – 16 – ounce can whole cranberry sauce
  • 6 pork loin rib chops, cut 1-inch thick (about 3-3/4 pounds total)
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil

 Directions:

  1. In a medium bowl, combine dry stuffing mix, water and butter. Stir in 3/4 cup of the cranberry sauce. Set remaining cranberry sauce aside.
  2. Trim fat from chops. Make a pocket in each chop by cutting a horizontal slit from the fat side of the chop almost to the bone. Spoon 1/4 cup of the stuffing mixture into pocket of each chop. If necessary, secure with wooden toothpicks. Spread any remaining stuffing in a 13x9x2-inch baking dish (3-quart rectangular).
  3. In a 12-inch skillet, brown chops, half at a time, on both sides in hot oil. Arrange chops in the baking dish over stuffing, overlapping as needed.
  4. Bake, uncovered, in a 325 degree F oven for 40 to 50 minutes or until an instant-read thermometer inserted in chops registers 160 degree F (make sure to insert thermometer into meat portion, not stuffing, and make sure thermometer does not touch bone) and juices run clear. Before serving, remove wooden toothpicks and discard.
  5. In a small saucepan, heat remaining cranberry sauce; spoon over the prepared chops. Makes 6 servings

Source and image credit:  MidwestLiving  

October is National Pork Month

By | Angus Meats, Food Service, News, Poultry, Retail | No Comments

October brings bright fall colors and trick-or-treating, but the autumn month also celebrates an important U.S. commodity – pork.

National Pork Month began as a way to promote the product when the animals came to market. Today, the month also focuses on the nation’s hardworking pig farmers and the continued environmental efforts they make. A study conducted by clean energy development company, the Camco Group, shows U.S. pig farmers have nearly doubled production during the past 50 years, while cutting water usage by 41 percent and reducing their carbon footprint by 35 percent.

Source: Illinois Farm Bureau